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Moses McLemore

Male 1739 - 1787  (~ 23 years)


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  • Name Moses McLemore  [1, 2, 3
    Born Between 1738 and 1739  Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3
    Gender Male 
    Died Between 1761 and 1787  [1, 2
    Notes 
    • Moses was the great grandfather of Maj. Amos McLemore, C.S.A., whom was the subject of Dr. Rudy Leverett's book "Ole Rosinheels: A Genealogical Sketch of the Famil of Major Amos McLemore, 27th Mississippi Infantry Regiment, C.S.A." James McLemore notes that a more particular outline of the activities and descendants of Wright McLemore can be found in that book (James L. McLemore, III, p 51).

      James McLemore has shown the date of death for Moses as circa 1761.

      If the references below, however, are for the SAME Moses McLemore, then he was alive until at least 1783.

      Robert McLemore Butler shows that Moses McLemore and Thomas AMES were witnesses to a deed between Abraham HUGGINS & Mary, his wife, to Howell HARTGRAVE dated 1769. (Deed Book 4, page 159)

      I also have in my notes, unsourced, a reference to a deed between Bedreadan CARRAWAY and Moses MACLEMORE dated 19 Aug 1775, with 20 pds being paid for 100 acres. Ref: MACLEMORE, Mose, Grantee Page 559, book 3

      In 1779, Moses McLEMORE and Thomas LIGHTWOOD were witnesses to a deed between James THALLEY to Lewis WILLIAMSON (Deed Book 6, pg 448), and on 1 Apr 1780 Grant #160 was to Moses McLEMORE for 188 acres on the S W side of Hoes Swamp (Book 41, pg 63) (Courtesy Robert McLemore Butler).

      1780-Duplin County, NC File #1889  1 Mar 1780 Moses McLEMORE Duplin County 188 acres, grant #160 entry #111 entered May 19, 1778, book 41, pg 63 on S W side of Hoes Swamp (Courtesy Robert McLemore Butler).

      Sampson County Deed Book Book 8, Page 17 Abstract of Deed

      Moses McLEMORE to Joseph PACKER

      North Carolina, Duplin County

      Moses MACLIMORE of the province of North Carolina, County of Duplin…in consideration of the sum of Fifty (50) pounds paid by Joseph PACKER of the province and County aforesaid…do convey…a Certain plantation tract….Being in the County of Duplin….on the South side of Horse branch Joining William DRAKES line including the Improvements….Being a tract of land that was granted to Matthew SMALL by patent Bearing date December the 29th 1783 and was conveyed by deed of sale from Matthew SMALL to Bednadan CARRAWAY and from Bednadan CARRAWAY to the said McLEMORE and from the aforesaid Moses MACLEMORE to Joseph PARKER….

      In witness whereof …Moses MACLEMORE have…set my hand this 18th day of January 1783…in the presence of Jas. OATS and Joseph (his mark) BENNETT Duplin County July Court 1783 Was proved in the…Court by the Oath of James OATS William DICKSON CC

      Registered…this 30 day of September 1783 Richard CLINTON, Regr

      (Abstracted by Melinda McLemore Strong on 7 July 2005)

      A subscriber to Genforum (email address marked private), posted the following reply to a query about Moses that I posted:

      This Moses McLemore is the grandson of William, but it is uncertain if his father was Wright or Richard. He died in Darlington County,(Old Cheraws District) SC in December 1787. Moses was living there when he died and his son, Amos, applied for letters of administration on his estate. Does anyone have any information on the children of this Moses?

      James L. McLemore, III writes that for in the third editon of "Ole Rosinheels" Rudy began to doubt if Moses was Wright's son and suspect that he was Richard's.  However, Jim still tends to follow the 2nd edition, because Moses spent most of his life with the other sons of Wright, first in Edgecombe County NC, the in the Duplin/Sampson Counties area in southeast North Carolina  only at the end of his life did he apparently move across the line into northeast South Carolina to die in December 1787 in the area where Richard had died in 1771, and where Richard's children still lived.  Leverett found good arguments on both sides of the issue (in the 3rd edition), but Jim still tends to go with Wright as Moses' father.
    • (Medical):A direct male descendant of Moses participated in the Morrision yDNA study.

      The main purpose of this study was to prove that the immigrant founders of this family in America, James Macklemore and Abraham Macklemore, were brothers. If brothers, then the y-DNA of the direct male descendants of both men would match. However, instead of confirming this, it appears that we have AT LEAST two distinct yDNA groups, with three additional potential lines. The first cluster of matching yDNA has ten members, who are part of the R1b1a2 haplogroup (highlighted on the spreadsheet in salmon). The R1b DNA haplogroup, is the most common in Western Europe. The direct descendant of Moses McLemore was in he R1ba2 cluster, along with two other participants who trace their lines back to the immigrant Abraham Macklemore, the husband of Mary Young. If both these members are correct in their paper trails, AND if Amos can be proven to be a great-grandson of James Macklemore, then the assumption that James and Abraham have a common paternal ancestor is correct as descendants of both men share the same yDNA. The other six members of this first cluster all have the McLemore surname, and all can trace their lineages back to McLemore men who predate the Civil War, but have not conclusively linked themselves back to either James or Abraham.

      See Morrison/McLemore DNA study results for Group O:

      http://www.geneticousins.com/morrison/
    Person ID I21764  Strong Family Tree
    Last Modified 17 Aug 2014 

    Father Wright McLemore,   b. Abt 1713, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 1760 and 1766  (Age ~ 47 years) 
    Mother ??? ???,   b. Bef 1715,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married Between 1731 and 1733 
    • James L. McLemore, III writes "But when we get down to Wright's children, I have come up with some dates of birth based on my analysis of Leverett's appendix entries in the third edition of his book "Ole Rosinheels", and the order of births then based on that analysis.  I may start to get a lot of argument from one or more of you as to that, and in fact I am not entirely satisfied with having so many children born so close together (one year apart).  But since several of these children went to the Duplin/Sampson/Bladen Counties area together, I figure the best place to start our discussion would be the basics, i.e., getting Wright's family more or less solidified (to the extent we can), or at least discussed, before going on down to the next generation or so where we find so many possible ancestors for those of you still trying to hook up."
    Family ID F7602  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family ??? ???,   b. Aft 1738,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married
    • Jmes McLemore, III writes that Moses and his wife had at least one son, Amos McLemore, but no known other family.
    Children 
     1. Amos McLemore,   b. Between 1760 and 1766, Edgecombe County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 19 Sep 2007 
    Family ID F7638  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Between 1738 and 1739 - Virginia Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Documents
    McLemore DNA Study Results NOVEMBER 2011  (see spreadsheet PDF at bottom of this page)
    Ancestor of a m268 of the R1b1 group (highlighted in salmon)
    The main purpose of this study was to prove that the immigrant founders of this family in America, James Macklemore and Abraham Macklemore, were brothers. If brothers, then the y-DNA of the direct male descendants of both men would match. However, instead of confirming this, it appears that we have AT LEAST two distinct yDNA groups, with three additional potential lines. The first cluster of matching yDNA has ten members, who are part of the R1b1a2 haplogroup (highlighted on the spreadsheet in salmon). The R1b DNA haplogroup, is the most common in Western Europe. Two of the ten participants can trace their lines back to the immigrant Abraham Macklemore, the husband of Mary Young. Another member (m268) can trace himself back to Moses McLemore b. ca. 1738 who is thought to be a son of Wright McLemore, grandson of William Macklemore, and great-grandson of the immigrant James Macklemore. If both these members are correct in their paper trails, AND if Amos can be proven to be a great-grandson of James Macklemore, then the assumption that James and Abraham have a common paternal ancestor is correct as descendants of both men share the same yDNA. The other seven members of this first cluster all have the McLemore surname, and all can trace their lineages back to McLemore men who predate the Civil War, but have not conclusively linked themselves back to either James or Abraham.

    The second cluster in the study have three members to date (this group is highlighted on the spreadsheet in green). They are all in the E1b1 Haplogroup, which is rare in Western Europe. All of them match each other, but do not match any other McLemores yet tested. All three of these members can trace their ancestry to John Macklemore of Virginia, the husband of Faith. Two of them descend from his son Burwell, and the third from his son Joel. But, as discussed above, IF we have also proven that the immigrants Abraham and James Macklemore are brothers, then it follows that John Macklemore could not be the biological son of the immigrant James, as the yDNA of these two clusters is very different.

    Our current thinking is that John was likely a son of Fortune’s and a stepson of James Macklemore, who raised him as his own. Alternatively, it may still be proven that James and Abraham were not brothers. They may share the same surname, but not the same paternal ancestry. More proven descendants of James and Fortune Macklemore will need to be tested to confirm or refute either theory.

    As an interesting side note, it had long been assumed that the Revolutionary War Soldier John McLemore, who lived for a time in North Carolina and died in Tennessee, was a son of Burwell MacLemore and Amy Gilliam. However, current DNA evidence indicates this could not be correct. This is because two descendants of Archibald McLemore of Knox County, TN, a son John McLemore the Revolutionary Soldier, are both part of the larger R1b1a2 cluster (highlighted in salmon). They do NOT match the DNA of Burwell’s other descendants in the E1b1 cluster. Therefore, it is evident that the John McLemore who moved to Tennessee and was the father of Archibald McLemore CAN NOT be the same John McLemore who was a son of Burwell McLemore.

    In addition to the two groups discussed above, there are three McLemore DNA volunteers who don’t match any of the McLemores in either of the first two groups, OR match each other. One of these men (highlighted in purple on the spreadsheet) is a descendant of Hiram McLemore of Lee County, VA and later Breathitt County, KY. Hiram has been speculated to be a son of John McLemore and Ruth Steelman, a grandson of Ephraim McLemore, and great grandson of the immigrant James. However, if James and Abraham Macklemore are brothers, then Hiram could not be a biological descendant of James. He would have to match the group of ten McLemore’s in the first group. Although Hiram McLemore's descendant is also part of the R1b1 Haplogroup, he is more than 10 markers removed (based on 25 markers tested) from being a match to any of the other R1b1 McLemore’s, and therefore could not share a common ancestor in a genealogically significant time period.

    The second unmatched volunteer (highlighted in blue) is a direct descendant of the McLemore family that moved from North Carolina to Jones County, GA and then onto Montgomery County, AL. He is part of the R1a haplogroup, common in many parts of Eurasia and Scandinavia. He can trace his line back through four generations of James McLemore’s to James Macklemore Jr, thought to be the son of James and Fortune. But again, if James and Abraham are brothers, then he could not be a biological descendant of James Macklemore, the immigrant.

    The third unmatched volunteer (highlighted in brown) descends from James Madison McLemore born 1861 in Louisiana and died & buried 1918 in Van Zandt County, Texas. He is thought to be a son of William Kearney McLemore b. 1825 and d. 1889, also buried in Van Zandt County, Texas. He is in the I1 haplogroup, which is the most common group in Scandinavia.

    It is currently not known why these McLemores do not yet match any other study members. It is possible that there were several founding McLemore lines, instead of just one as has been long assumed. Or another possibility could be that undisclosed adoptions have occurred through the generations of descendants of both James and/or Abraham.

    Please help us to continue to unravel these DNA mysteries by volunteering to take part in this study. Email me for more details (stxstrong@gmail.com), or you can enroll directly at this websites listed below.

    http://www.geneticousins.com/morrison/

    or here

    http://www.familytreedna.com/project-join-request.aspx?group=Morrison

    Also, if you have had your yDNA tested outside of the Morrison group, please let us know. We would be glad to add your results to the spreadsheet.

    If you have trouble viewing this spreadsheet, email me at stxstrong@gmail.com and I can send you an excel spreadsheet or PDF.


  • Sources 
    1. [S206] McLemore, James L. III ("The Early History of the McLemore Family of Virginia and the Carolinas").

    2. [S321] Freeman, Mark (mwfgenealogy@verizon.net) "Mostly Southern" http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=markfreeman ; Ver. 2008-09-19 17:51:13.

    3. [S371] Butler, Robert McLemore--Family Researcher Fuquay Varina, NC 27526 (deceased).