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Abraham Macklemore

Male Aft 1664 - Aft 1735  (~ 71 years)


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  • Name Abraham Macklemore  [1, 2
    Born Aft 1664  Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died Aft 1735  Bertie County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Notes 
    • Abraham Macklemore (was) settled on the banks of the Roanoke River, just across the Virginia-North Carolina line following its establishment by the Byrd Commission in 1728. (James L. McLemore, III, p 36). He appeared to have married first the daughter of Abraham EVANS, who owned land near Richard WASHINGTON and who devised land to Abraham Macklemore, presumably his son-in-law. However, EVANS' daughter apparently died childless not too long after her father, leaving Macklemore disinherited of his 70 acre devise, but free to marry, about 1720, his second wife Mary YOUNG. (James L. McLemore, III pp. 37 - 38).

      There are some deed records in Bertie County, North Carolina (from which Northampton County was formed in 1741) for Abraham. This is further evidence that their (Abraham and James) earlier deed records may have been in Prince George and thus may not have survived. Besides all of James' lands, Abraham may have already owned some of his lands as well (perhaps acquired while it was still part of Virginia) by the time the first North Carolina deed involving him was recorded. This deed, dated August 11, 1730, was from Abraham Macklemore to William Person for two acres on Stonehouse (or Beaver Dam) Creek in Northwest Parish of Bertie Precinct (Bertie Deed Book C, p 354). This land was probably cut from land he already owned, but he shortly thereafter acquired a sizeable tract of 625 acres from Barnebee MACKINNE, a former Isle of Wight County, Virginia resident. This plantation was located in Northwest Parish of Bertie County (where both men claimed residence), on the North side of the old Morratock River, on the old COUNTRY (not county) line, which formed the northern boundary line of the property. This was obviously a reference to the old colonial boundry before the 1728 survey moved it northward. Five years later, he purchased 100 acres on "Pigeons Ruste Creek" on Morratock River, at "old country line", from Anthony GANT of Edgecombe, by deed dated May 8, 1734 (Bertie Deed Book D, p, 155). (James L. McLemore, III, pp 40-41).

      Abraham's Will was signed 4 Jan 1735 and lists three children Atkins, Young and William in addition to his wife Mary. Original Will on file in NC State Archives.

      Dated 4 Jan 1735, Nov Ct 1736

      "... being weak in body ..."

      Son Atkin macklemore - Negro Judey, to possess said Negro at the age of twenty-one and not before. Sons Young Macklemore and William - Negro Joan, but if either of my two youngest sons dies before the age of twenty-one the other will inherit his share. Son Atkin - 200 acres belonging to my upper plantation. Son Young - my manner plantation after my wife's decease. Rest of estate to my wife (unnamed).

      Ex. Wife

      Wit: William Gillim, William Clanton, Joseph Brady

      (Probate indicates Mary Macklemore was the executrix named in the will).

      (Extract courtesy of Mark Freeman)

      The following information about Abraham was posted to the McLemore GenForum by Gayle Zent in January, 1999:

      The second son was Abraham, his will was written in 1736, 3 yrs after his brother's will was written. He left 200 acres of upper plantation , a manor plantation, helped lay out Warren Co NC & became a wealthy landowner. We have records in 1778 that enters 500 & then 200 acres in Biredie Co to Abraham. He was a commisioner in the county of Warrenton in 1779 & he had a gun factory during the Revolutionary War.

      http://genforum.genealogy.com/mclemore/messages/87.html

      And this was posted at http://www.unsolvedancestry.com/awards.asp:

      Abraham could have been married to an Evans, daughter of Abraham Evans and Elizabeth Lucas before 1719. "Abraham Evans wrote his will in 1708, died (and his will was probated) in 1712, in which he willed 70 acres to Abraham Macklemore, and the heirs of his body (meaning on condition that he have children [implied by his wife, Evans' daughter]). Abraham had no children by her, so he lost the land, and instead moved to NC with his brother, and either after or more likely before doing so he married as his second wife Mary Young, mother of his three sons." - Mary Young (Abraham's wife) may be related to an earlier Mary (Cary) Young, daughter of John Cary of Surry Co. VA.
    • (Medical):Two descendants of Abraham, both men still bearing the McLemore surname, participated in the MORRISON DNA Study.

      http://www.geneticcousins.com/morrison/

      The main purpose of this study was to prove that the immigrant founders of this family in America, James Macklemore and Abraham Macklemore, were brothers. If brothers, then the y-DNA of the direct male descendants of both men would match. However, Instead of proving that all McLemore men\emdash at least those that can trace their ancestry back to an early southern McLemore forebearer---share the same DNA, it appears that we have AT LEAST two distinct yDNA groups, with three more potential distinct yDNA McLemore lines. The first group of McLemore DNA is the largest, with ten members, in the R1b1a2 haplogroup. Two of the nine can trace their lines back to Abraham Macklemore, the husband of Mary Young and probable brother of James Macklemore. Another member (m268) can trace himself back to Moses McLemore b. ca. 1738 who is thought to be a son of Wright McLemore, grandson of William Macklemore, and great-grandson of immigrant James McLemore, thought to be the brother of Abraham. If both these members are correct in their paper trails, and if Amos can be indeed be proven to be a great-grandson of James Macklemore, then the assumption that James and Abraham have a common paternal ancestor is likely correct as descendants of both men share the same yDNA. The R1b1 DNA haplogroup, is the most common in Western Europe.
    Person ID I21644  Strong Family Tree
    Last Modified 15 Oct 2014 

    Father Prob. William McIlmorrow,   b. Bef 1640, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jul 1664, Colmonell Parish, Ayrshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 24 years) 
    Mother Mary Aitken,   b. Bef 1642, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Family ID F7451  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 ??? Evans,   b. Bef 1700,   d. Bef 1720  (Age ~ 20 years) 
    Married Bef 1720 
    Last Modified 21 Jun 2013 
    Family ID F7600  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Mary Young,   b. Bef 1702,   d. Aft Feb 1737, Northhampton County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 35 years) 
    Married Abt 1720  [3, 4
    Children 
     1. Atkins McLemore,   b. Abt 1724, Bertie County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. May 1791, Warren County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 67 years)
     2. Young McLemore,   b. Abt 1726, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 9 Apr 1804, Williamson County, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 78 years)
     3. William Macklemore,   b. Abt 1728, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef Feb 1736, Bertie County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 8 years)
    Last Modified 9 Dec 2006 
    Family ID F7601  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Aft 1664 - Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Aft 1735 - Bertie County, North Carolina Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Documents
    McLemore DNA Study Results NOVEMBER 2011  (see spreadsheet PDF at bottom of this page)
    yDNA results for Direct Male Descendants of Abraham Macklemore, the immigrant, fourth row and eighth row.
    The main purpose of this study was to prove that the immigrant founders of this family in America, James Macklemore and Abraham Macklemore, were brothers. If brothers, then the y-DNA of the direct male descendants of both men would match. However, instead of confirming this, it appears that we have AT LEAST two distinct yDNA groups, with three additional potential lines. The first cluster of matching yDNA has ten members, who are part of the R1b1a2 haplogroup (highlighted on the spreadsheet in salmon). The R1b DNA haplogroup, is the most common in Western Europe. Two of the ten participants can trace their lines back to the immigrant Abraham Macklemore, the husband of Mary Young. Another member (m268) can trace himself back to Moses McLemore b. ca. 1738 who is thought to be a son of Wright McLemore, grandson of William Macklemore, and great-grandson of the immigrant James Macklemore. If both these members are correct in their paper trails, AND if Amos can be proven to be a great-grandson of James Macklemore, then the assumption that James and Abraham have a common paternal ancestor is correct as descendants of both men share the same yDNA. The other seven members of this first cluster all have the McLemore surname, and all can trace their lineages back to McLemore men who predate the Civil War, but have not conclusively linked themselves back to either James or Abraham.

    The second cluster in the study have three members to date (this group is highlighted on the spreadsheet in green). They are all in the E1b1 Haplogroup, which is rare in Western Europe. All of them match each other, but do not match any other McLemores yet tested. All three of these members can trace their ancestry to John Macklemore of Virginia, the husband of Faith. Two of them descend from his son Burwell, and the third from his son Joel. But, as discussed above, IF we have also proven that the immigrants Abraham and James Macklemore are brothers, then it follows that John Macklemore could not be the biological son of the immigrant James, as the yDNA of these two clusters is very different.

    Our current thinking is that John was likely a son of Fortune’s and a stepson of James Macklemore, who raised him as his own. Alternatively, it may still be proven that James and Abraham were not brothers. They may share the same surname, but not the same paternal ancestry. More proven descendants of James and Fortune Macklemore will need to be tested to confirm or refute either theory.

    As an interesting side note, it had long been assumed that the Revolutionary War Soldier John McLemore, who lived for a time in North Carolina and died in Tennessee, was a son of Burwell MacLemore and Amy Gilliam. However, current DNA evidence indicates this could not be correct. This is because two descendants of Archibald McLemore of Knox County, TN, a son John McLemore the Revolutionary Soldier, are both part of the larger R1b1a2 cluster (highlighted in salmon). They do NOT match the DNA of Burwell’s other descendants in the E1b1 cluster. Therefore, it is evident that the John McLemore who moved to Tennessee and was the father of Archibald McLemore CAN NOT be the same John McLemore who was a son of Burwell McLemore.

    In addition to the two groups discussed above, there are three McLemore DNA volunteers who don’t match any of the McLemores in either of the first two groups, OR match each other. One of these men (highlighted in purple on the spreadsheet) is a descendant of Hiram McLemore of Lee County, VA and later Breathitt County, KY. Hiram has been speculated to be a son of John McLemore and Ruth Steelman, a grandson of Ephraim McLemore, and great grandson of the immigrant James. However, if James and Abraham Macklemore are brothers, then Hiram could not be a biological descendant of James. He would have to match the group of ten McLemore’s in the first group. Although Hiram McLemore's descendant is also part of the R1b1 Haplogroup, he is more than 10 markers removed (based on 25 markers tested) from being a match to any of the other R1b1 McLemore’s, and therefore could not share a common ancestor in a genealogically significant time period.

    The second unmatched volunteer (highlighted in blue) is a direct descendant of the McLemore family that moved from North Carolina to Jones County, GA and then onto Montgomery County, AL. He is part of the R1a haplogroup, common in many parts of Eurasia and Scandinavia. He can trace his line back through four generations of James McLemore’s to James Macklemore Jr, thought to be the son of James and Fortune. But again, if James and Abraham are brothers, then he could not be a biological descendant of James Macklemore, the immigrant.

    The third unmatched volunteer (highlighted in brown) descends from James Madison McLemore born 1861 in Louisiana and died & buried 1918 in Van Zandt County, Texas. He is thought to be a son of William Kearney McLemore b. 1825 and d. 1889, also buried in Van Zandt County, Texas. He is in the I1 haplogroup, which is the most common group in Scandinavia.

    It is currently not known why these McLemores do not yet match any other study members. It is possible that there were several founding McLemore lines, instead of just one as has been long assumed. Or another possibility could be that undisclosed adoptions have occurred through the generations of descendants of both James and/or Abraham.

    Please help us to continue to unravel these DNA mysteries by volunteering to take part in this study. Email me for more details (stxstrong@gmail.com), or you can enroll directly at this websites listed below.

    http://www.geneticousins.com/morrison/

    or here

    http://www.familytreedna.com/project-join-request.aspx?group=Morrison

    Also, if you have had your yDNA tested outside of the Morrison group, please let us know. We would be glad to add your results to the spreadsheet.

    If you have trouble viewing this spreadsheet, email me at stxstrong@gmail.com and I can send you an excel spreadsheet or PDF.


  • Sources 
    1. [S1094] Carroll County Homecoming '86 Historical Book Committee "History of Carroll County, Tennessee" (Turner Publishing Company, Paducah, KY) First Printing 1986, Second Printing 1998, p. 257 (Reliability: 3).

    2. [S206] McLemore, James L. III ("The Early History of the McLemore Family of Virginia and the Carolinas"), p. 36 (Reliability: 3).

    3. [S321] Freeman, Mark (mwfgenealogy@verizon.net) "Mostly Southern" http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=markfreeman ; Ver. 2008-09-19 17:51:13.

    4. [S206] McLemore, James L. III ("The Early History of the McLemore Family of Virginia and the Carolinas"), p 40 (Reliability: 3).